Two Outcomes of Oil Fracking

Originally posted on Recovery Diva:

#1- Earthquakes.  In the current issue of the New Yorker magazine is this article about the arrival of man-made earthquakes in OK, thanks to the oil extraction processes now being used there. See: How to make an Earthquake.

#2 – Health Problems.  From the Washington Post, see: Rise of deadly radon gas in Pennsylvania buildings linked to fracking industry

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April 13 Webinar- NOAA’s Climate Resilience Toolkit

April 13th – Webinar: The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit

This free webinar examines National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) climate resilience toolkit, which provides resources and a framework for understanding climate issues. Topics include coastal flood risk, ecosystem vulnerability, food resilience, water resources, and increased risk of infectious disease.
To register, please click here.

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Two Outcomes of Oil Fracking

#1- Earthquakes.  In the current issue of the New Yorker magazine is this article about the arrival of man-made earthquakes in OK, thanks to the oil extraction processes now being used there. See: How to make an Earthquake.

#2 – Health Problems.  From the Washington Post, see: Rise of deadly radon gas in Pennsylvania buildings linked to fracking industry

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Public Health Research During Disasters

Enabling Rapid and Sustainable Public Health Research During Disasters;
Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2014). You can download a pdf version from the website at no cost.

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Do We Have, or Need, a Community for Disaster Science?

From the current issue of Science Magazine (April 2015), see this editorial by the editor-in-chief who used to be director of the USGS. The title is A Community for Disaster Science.

I am not going to comment just yet on the article. I have sent it to the directors of the Disaster Research Center at the Univ. of DE, Prof. James Kendra, and to the Hazards Center at the Univ. of CO/Boulder, Prof. Kathleen Tierney. I am awaiting their replies. In the meantime I invite readers to comment.

Update: See this posting by Eric Holdeman with his take on this topic.

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Thanks to Ian McLean in NZ for bringing this article to my attention.

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Resilience Project at ABAG

See this major new project done by the Association of Bay Area Governments:  Stronger Housing, Safer Communities.

This new project could be used as a guide for other regions/communities. It’s a multi-part study led by the Association of Bay Area Governments with funding from an array of federal partners and with a particular focus on linking up thinking about climate change (particularly sea level rise) with current flooding and seismic risks.

ABAG first established a framework for thinking about the hazards, then they worked with a steering committee to develop a set of housing and ‘community-scale’ vulnerability indicators for those hazards. One of the challenges was defining indicators that could be measured region-wide with available data. I was involved with the 3rd part which was to develop a suite of strategies targeting local governments and how to better manage multi-hazard risk. We were looking at priority development areas across the region, many of which are near transit corridors along the margins of San Francisco Bay with high earthquake liquefaction and current/future flooding risks. One of the key goals of this effort was to better link up the land use planning and policy tool kits that we have for dealing with seismic and flood related hazards.

For more info, cont act the project manager: Danielle Meiler at ABAG: <DanielleM@abag.ca.gov>.

Thanks to Laurie A. Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting | Research, for this information and the link,

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Storm-Ready Hospital Design

Storm-Ready Design Defends Hospitals Against Natural Disasters. Transcript of an NPR segment:

The 2011 tornado in Joplin, Mo., destroyed the city’s hospital and left the injured with almost no where to go for emergency services. With an increasing number of large-scale natural disasters, hospitals are incorporating new storm-resistant features into their designs.

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