Housing Needs in the Aftermath of Disaster

Housing and Disasters: Thoughts on Hurricane Katrina and Haiti.  From the Brookings Institution.

The article states some well-known facts about housing recovery, but they are worth repeating for those new to the field.  An excerpt:

But the ultimate lessons I took away from the two very different meetings are that: finding housing solutions for those displaced by disasters (either in very rich or in very poor countries) takes a long time. Long after the television cameras have moved on, when people don’t have a secure place to live, the disaster continues. Furthermore, those who seem to be most in need of housing are among the most vulnerable in the communities and are disproportionately renters rather than homeowners.

One thought on “Housing Needs in the Aftermath of Disaster

  1. The assignment of disaster relief to HUD under President Nixon’s Reorganization No. 1 of 1973 was primarily based on housing issues and also the basis of Nixon firing Secretary Romney during the aftermath of Tropical Storm Agnes in 1972! Romney had failed to provide temporary housing or repairs for thousands in the Lycoming Valley of Pennsylvania and the Wilkes-Barre area and throughout the Susquehanna River watershed which STATE AND LOCAL mission not a federal mission.

    AS WE APPROACH THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF THAT PLAN SUGGEST ALL INVOLVED IN DISASTER POLICY REVIEW THAT REPORT!

    Few STATE and Local governments take any interest in the long range implications of disaster policy and focus only on funding distorted response and recovery efforts that are largely directed at masking STATE and Local negligence in the face of MOTHER NATURE and we all know that MOTHER NATURE DOES NOT GRANT VARIANCES!

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