Additional Details re Calgary and Alberta

From my friend Pierre Picard in Toronto, some additional details re the posting yesterday. He writes that the  2013 Alberta floods recovery process will be long and challenging.

As stated in the article: “the Redford government unveiled a recovery plan for homeowners that bans new developments in floodways, but will pay for expenses to repair or rebuild damaged houses. However, future disaster assistance will not be offered to homeowners who rebuild in these designated floodways.” The Alberta Government new government policies will support homeowners’ rebuilding choices: building in flood risk areas, extra money for flood mitigation, future coverage, and future development in floodways. This Alberta Government chart summarizes the flood choices for Albertans.  For an example of flood hazard study and mapping: High River, Alberta.

This is in line with Public Safety Canada’s Guidelines for the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements Chapter III – General eligibility criteria, Section 3.6 flood damage eligibility, and the Financial Support to Provinces and Territories for 2011 Flood Mitigation Investments which established a costs share on a 50-50 basis between the Government of Canada, Provinces and Territories affected by flooding in 2011, and consisted of investments in permanent flood mitigation measures that are not otherwise eligible under the Federal Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA).  These mitigation measures included structural mitigation and non-structural mitigation: Federal Financial Support to Provinces and Territories for 2011 Permanent Flood Mitigation Investments Guidelines.

A June 24, 2013 article in the  Globe and Mail mentioned Alberta Shelved major flood report for six years includes a 2006 report (Provincial Flood Mitigation Report: Consultation and Recommendations) that identified 36 communities that required flood risk studies. In recommendations 10 of the 2006 report, the Chair states: “we recommend that the flood mitigation strategy include a cessation of the sale of crown lands in known flood risk areas.”  Additionally, the recommendation stipulates that “the sale of flood-prone crown lands creates the potential for increased financial liability for the province in terms of Disaster Recovery Program funding that must outweigh the short-term financial benefits of the sale,” is in line with your article.

In addition to your post “In Calgary, a call for a review of the Province’s role”, the Elliot Lake Inquiry mandated Mr. Justice (Ret’d) Paul R. Bélanger to inquire into and report on the collapse on June 23, 2012, of the Algo Centre Mall in Elliot Lake, Ontario, the two deaths and injuries to others as part 1, but also, the emergency management and response as part 2: “the events and relevant legislation, regulations and bylaws, policies processes and procedures of provincial and municipal governments and other parties in respect of the emergency management and response.  The public hearings began on March 4, 2013.  Although Canada’s Transportation Safety Board in holding off any comments in support of a public inquiry, the Quebec provincial government “hasn’t ruled out the possibility of a public inquiry into the derailment and explosion in Lac-Mégantic,” meanwhile, recovery will remains a long term challenge.

The recovery process will indeed be long and challenging. As stated in the article: “the Redford government unveiled a recovery plan for homeowners that bans new developments in floodways, but will pay for expenses to repair or rebuild damaged houses. However, future disaster assistance will not be offered to homeowners who rebuild in these designated floodways.” The Alberta Government new government policies will support homeowners’ rebuilding choices: building in flood risk areas, extra money for flood mitigation, future coverage, and future development in floodways. This Alberta Government chart summarizes the flood choices for Albertans.  For an example of flood hazard study and mapping: High River, Alberta.

This is in line with Public Safety Canada’s Guidelines for the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements Chapter III – General eligibility criteria, Section 3.6 flood damage eligibility, and the Financial Support to Provinces and Territories for 2011 Flood Mitigation Investments which established a costs share on a 50-50 basis between the Government of Canada, Provinces and Territories affected by flooding in 2011, and consisted of investments in permanent flood mitigation measures that are not otherwise eligible under the Federal Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA).  These mitigation measures included structural mitigation and non-structural mitigation: Federal Financial Support to Provinces and Territories for 2011 Permanent Flood Mitigation Investments Guidelines.

A June 24, 2013 published article from The Globe and Mail: Alberta Shelved major flood report for six years includes a 2006 report (Provincial Flood Mitigation Report: Consultation and Recommendations) that identified 36 communities that required flood risk studies. In recommendations 10 of the 2006 report, the Chair states: “we recommend that the flood mitigation strategy include a cessation of the sale of crown lands in known flood risk areas.”  Additionally, the recommendation stipulates that “the sale of flood-prone crown lands creates the potential for increased financial liability for the province in terms of Disaster Recovery Program funding that must outweigh the short-term financial benefits of the sale,” is in line with your article.

In addition to your post “In Calgary, a call for a review of the Province’s role”, the Elliot Lake Inquiry mandated Mr. Justice (Ret’d) Paul R. Bélanger to inquire into and report on the collapse on June 23, 2012, of the Algo Centre Mall in Elliot Lake, Ontario, the two deaths and injuries to others as part 1, but also, the emergency management and response as part 2: “the events and relevant legislation, regulations and bylaws, policies processes and procedures of provincial and municipal governments and other parties in respect of the emergency management and response.  The public hearings began on March 4, 2013.  Although Canada’s Transportation Safety Board in holding off any comments in support of a public inquiry, the Quebec provincial government “hasn’t ruled out the possibility of a public inquiry into the derailment and explosion in Lac-Mégantic,” meanwhile, recovery will remains a long term challenge.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s