The Conflict at FEMA Between Rhetoric and Actions on Climate Change

First as tragedy, then as farce: FEMA still to adapt to climate change . Despite the agency’s attempts to account for bigger storms, its outdated rules leave communities unprepared for disaster.

An indepth look at recent disasters and the problems that FEMA has in dealing with recovery, highlighting needed changes in rules and regulations.

This article from AlJazeera America relies on a recent report from the New England Center for Investigative Reporting is a nonprofit newsroom based at Boston University and WGBH News that produces investigative reporting and trains the next generation of journalists. The Fund for Investigative Journalism helped fund this report; http://www.necir.org. The direct link to the original version is here.

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3 Responses to The Conflict at FEMA Between Rhetoric and Actions on Climate Change

  1. Joel says:

    I think a lot of the problems come from the Directorate-level separation of programs and the ways recovery and post-disaster mitigation funds are awarded. That, and having so much of the program implementation directed by legislation (political) rather than allowing program experts flexibility. We can’t expect programs to function if they’re being redirected following every election. Otherwise, we should scale back Federal programs (along with the taxes that fund them) and leave more of the decisions at the local level.

  2. recoverydiva says:

    Your points are good ones.

  3. And yet they’re demanding that local jurisdictions take climate change into account. With the EPA mucking up waterways in CO and NM (and not following their own reporting requirements!), and this farce, even the most confirmed advocates of greater government involvement in just about anything have to stop and think.

    I also question the premise of more extreme weather – the ’30’s and ’50’s were worse.

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