New Webpage for Health Resources on Children in Disasters and Emergencies

Health Resources on Children in Disasters and Emergencies — this new  NIH-based webpage is collaboration between several federal and national agencies and the National Library of Medicine. It is a compendium of resources related to medical and public health issues of children in disasters and emergencies. Links are provided to both journal articles and to other documents and materials that may be useful in preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery activities.

Resources are national or international in scope. The intent of this compendium is to consolidate the multitude of resources available across a variety of organizations, Web sites, databases and training sites, making the search for relevant materials simpler and more direct.

 

” To Reduce the Impact of Disasters, Increase the Focus on Children”

From the HuffPost, an interesting article by the head of UNICEF. See: To Reduce the Impact of Disasters, Increase the Focus on Children.  Here are some numbers that indicate how big this segment of the population is:

The number of children affected every year by disasters is projected to reach 175 million over the next ten years — a figure that will have nearly tripled since the early 1990s. Children represent more than half of all people affected by disasters, and not surprisingly, the children at greatest risk are typically the poorest and hardest to reach.

Unexpected Outcomes from Environmental/Medical Disasters

In environmental disasters, families experience conflict, denial, silence; from Homeland Security Newswire, April 3,  2012. Some excerpts:

Environmental disasters affect individuals and communities; they also affect how family members communicate with each other, sometimes in surprising ways; the researchers say that the findings were, in some ways, counterintuitive

Environmental disasters affect individuals and communities; they also affect how family members communicate with each other, sometimes in surprising ways, according to a paper published by a faculty member at the University at Buffalo in the Journal of Family Issues.

A University of Buffalo release reports that the study is the first systematic analysis of how families communicate when faced with serious health issues brought on by “slow moving technological disasters,” like environmental disasters.

Note the researchers studied environmental and medical disasters, not the usual types of events we term man-made.

Thanks to Wanda Headly, librarian extraordinaire, at the Hazards Center in Boulder, CO for helping me locate the full text of the article.

 

______________________________

Please patronize our sponsor, DisasterBookstore.com

______________________________

Children and Disasters – new report

 

Albany, Georgia, March 15, 1998 -- Baptist chu...

Image via Wikipedia

 

National Commission on Children and Disasters, 2010 Report to the President and Congress; 192 pp., Oct. 2010. An Exec. Summary is available.

Recommendation #1.2. The President should accelerate the development and implementation of the National Disaster Recovery Framework with an explicit emphasis on addressing the immediate and long-term physical and mental health, education, housing and human services recovery needs of children.