Once Again – Failure to Learn from Experience

From Governing, this article about a recent IBHS study: As Storms Worsen, Many Coastal States Aren’t Prepared. Lax building codes and poor enforcement are a big problem in some places. An excerpt:

Eight out of the 18 hurricane-prone coastal states along the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Coast are highly vulnerable, according to a new report from the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS). The report, Rating the States: 2018, is the institute’s third in six years. It evaluates the states on 47 factors that include whether residential building codes are mandated statewide, whether states and localities enforce those codes, and whether licensing and education are required of building officials, contractors and subcontractors.

Overall, the institute found “a concerning lack of progress” in the adoption and enforcement of updated residential building code systems across most of the states examined. “There’s not been much movement from [the first report] in 2012 to today,” says Julie Rochman, who stepped down as CEO and president of IBHS in April. “There’s some inertia.”

Once More on the Value of Mitigation

New article from Scientific American: Communities are spending money on disasters at the wrong time: after the damage has been done, not before.

That is the central theme Zurich Insurance Group takes in a recently released report that draws conclusions about natural disaster mitigation by analyzing a series of 12 events—floods, storms and hurricanes—since the summer of 2013.

In its study, the global insurer found that every $1 spent on “disaster resilience” saves $5 in limiting future costs, including post-storm cleanup efforts.

In recent years, various reports have cited savings of $4,.$5, and $6 dollars in costs but whatever the number the message is mitigation pays.

Is Structural Mitigation the Answer for Protecting Boston Harbor?

The Diva was watching Nightly Business News on May 30th and was especially interested in a feature they did about potential flooding in Boston harbor and its effects on current and planned real estate development in that area. [Personal note: the Diva is from the Boston area and her dad owned a store in the harbor area.]

I was told by a Boston-based friend that recently there has been extensive news coverage regarding a proposed flood barrier costing over $12 billion dollars, which will not be fully completed until 2050. That is a long time to wait, and one can only wonder if a barrier will in fact solve the Boston Harbor inundation problem due to sea level rise.

I was told that Boston’s 2015 Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan did not include the proposed flood barrier,  but preferred natural shoreline solutions which are much less expensive to implement on a quicker timeline.

For those interested in the Boston mitigation situation, which is probably a bellweather for other major eastern coastal cities, here are several news articles:

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/massachusetts/articles/2018-05-30/report-harbor-barrier-could-take-30-years-and-12b-to-build

 http://www.wbur.org/news/2018/05/30/boston-harbor-barrier-flooding-umass-study
 
https://www.statesman.com/news/report-boston-harbor-barrier-could-take-years-cost-12b/BSJIcj5ZkKy8Gdue3b6jYM/
 
www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/the-next-big-dig-umass-study-warns-boston-harbor-barrier-not-worth-cost-or-effort/ar-AAy0JNR
 
http://www.bostonherald.com/opinion/editorials/2018/05/editorial_costly_plans_wrong_way_to_solve_coastal_flooding
 
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/05/30/report-boston-harbor-barrier-could-take-30-years-cost-12b.html
 
http://www.newburyportnews.com/news/regional_news/report-boston-harbor-barrier-doesn-t-make-sense-to-prevent/article_20597391-5745-5a16-a5cc-875529c7f146.html
 
 

Another Take on Mitigation

Staying safe from disasters pays, but will funders listen?  Excerpts:

The startup MyStrongHome, which works in the coastal areas of Alabama, Louisiana and South Carolina, allows homeowners to pay for a new, reinforced roof out of savings from the lower insurance bills they get thanks to their dwelling being safer.

Green estimates that potential losses in a storm would be 30 to 60 percent lower in the strengthened homes. The work, carried out by the firm’s contractors, typically costs around $10,000. Participants make a down-payment of between $2,000 and $3,000, and pay back the rest over five to seven years.