Report Recommends Modifying Hurricane Relief Strategies

As cited in HSNews this report from GA Tech: Modify Hurricane Relief Strategies, National Academies Report Recommends.

Alleviating suffering more effectively in the wake of hurricanes may require a shift in relief strategies. In the immediate aftermath, relief agencies rush in survival supplies like water, food, medicine, and blankets. But instead of prioritizing and maintaining the relief supply chains, a transition to restoring a place’s normal supply infrastructure could help more people more quickly.

Supply Chain Resilience and the 2017 Hurricane Season

CNA has prepared a major report (164 pp) on the topic of Supply Chain Resilience and the 2017 Hurricane Season. It is a collection of case studies about Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Marie and their impact on supply chain resilience.  It was released in Sept. 2018 and more work on this topic is underway presently at the National Academy of Sciences.

Thanks to Delilah Barton, one of the authors, for the citation and link.

 

Atlantic Hurricanes are Strengthening Faster

From HStoday, this article: Atlantic Hurricanes Are Strengthening Faster, Partially Because of Climate Change, Study Finds. Hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin are exploding into monster storms at a rapid pace more and more often, and climate change is one reason why, a new study has found.

Published Thursday in the journal Nature Communications, the findings compiled by a team of hurricane experts – several of whom work for NOAA – concluded that rapid intensification is happening more often than it should.
The result can be a hurricane that grows from a relatively tame Category 1 to a massive Category 4 or 5 storm, the most recent example being Hurricane Michael, which ravaged the Florida Panhandle last October (the Gulf of Mexico is included as part of the Atlantic Basin).

Direct link to the full article.

Comparison of Federal Responses to Three 2017 Hurricanes

Quantifying inequities in US federal response to hurricane disaster in Texas and Florida compared with Puerto Rico. ( 6 pp.)

Our results show that the federal government responded on a larger scale and much more quickly across measures of federal money and staffing to Hurricanes Harvey and Irma in Texas and Florida, compared with Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. The variation in the responses was not commensurate with storm severity and need after landfall in the case of Puerto Rico compared with Texas and Florida. Assuming that disaster responses should be at least commensurate to the degree of storm severity and need of the population, the insufficient response received by Puerto Rico raises concern for growth in health disparities and increases in adverse health outcomes

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale

The Saffir-Simpson Scale is the one that scientists use to rank hurricanes. Presently, the scale has 5 categories, but recently there is talk of adding a 6th. See this article about that new category in the WashPost.

The Diva had the pleasure of meeting Bob Simpson at the Natural Hazards Center in Boulder, CO many years ago. A nice gentleman, who was the first head of the National Hurricane Center.